Artist


The Brummies

“Good evening, we’re the Brummies.”

With that simple introduction, so opens one of the year’s most immersive and adventurous rock albums, Eternal Reach. The debut LP by Birmingham, Alabama, band the Brummies – their name is U.K. slang for a resident of Birmingham – Eternal Reach is a musician’s album, distinguished by inventive arrangements, lush melodies and straight-to-tape production. Perfectly suited for losing yourself beneath a pair of quality headphones, the record evokes the psych-rock vibe of the Sixties and the soft indie-folk of the Nineties, yet possesses a timeless sound all its own.

Made up of vocalists and multi-instrumentalists John Davidson and Jacob Bryant, and drummer Trevor Davis, the Brummies have been playing together in various incarnations since high school. The members count the Beatles, Elton John, ELO, Blitzen Trapper and My Morning Jacket among their influences, but also have an affinity for sweeping film soundtracks, a passion that informs Eternal Reach.

“We knew we wanted to tell a story with Eternal Reach. It’s very thematic and it sounds like a movie,” says Jacob. “But it’s a love story: from meeting the person to the breakup, to that feeling where you think you might die without them, and then the realization that it’s all going to be OK. We thought a lot about that.”

“We’d talk out the storyline and say, ‘Well, maybe this happened,’” adds John.

Sums up Trevor, “It all evolved into this.”

Recorded at Battle Tapes Recording in Nashville with engineer Jeremy Ferguson and co-producer David Hopkins, Eternal Reach now serves as the Brummies’ stunning calling card. Beginning this summer, with appearances at festivals like Bonnaroo and the Sloss Music & Arts Fest in their hometown, they’ll tour the album tirelessly. They’ve already logged countless miles on the road, playing with St. Paul & the Broken Bones, Kacey Musgraves, the Wild Feathers and, this past fall, NEEDTOBREATHE.

Now they’re prepared to re-create Eternal Reach live for their growing number of fans and give them what they call a “full musical experience.”

“When they hear the record, I’d love them to appreciate the sounds we chose, the lyrics we wrote and how this is the story we’re trying to tell,” says Jacob.

“It’s a complete piece of work and we want people to be able to tell that we took our time with it,” adds John. “This is the sound of the Brummies.”